BAULE GOLI GLIN MASKS, Ivory Coast

 


This mask has been vetted as being authentic with signs of use and some age.

Photographs © Hamill Gallery

The Baule are one of the Akan peoples. They moved west to the Ivory Coast more than 200 years ago and adpted masking traditions from their neighbors, the Guro, Senufo and Yaure peoples. There are four basic types used in a special dance of rejoicing called Goli, symbolizing the social order, Kplekple, the junior male, Goli Glin, the senior male, Kpan Pre, the junior female ans Kpan, the senior female. This second type, a Goli Glin mask, representing the Senior male, is aqggressively complex and three-dimensionall. It has a strong, older nature spirit and takes the form of a bushcow, antelope and crocodile combination. They were painted red, symbolizing blood, danger and aggression. Women and children were not allowed to look at them closely.

We recommend Baule: African Art Western Eyes by Susan M. Vogel (Yale).

GO TO BAULE GOLI GLIN MASKS ARCHIVES PAGE (ALL SOLD)

GO TO A DILEMMA OF HORNS EXHIBITION PAGE

GO TO PAINT! EXHIBITION PAGE

GO TO BAULE ART PAGE

GO TO BAULE SCULPTURE EXHIBITION PAGE

GO TO BAULE GOLI MASKS (LARGE) PAGE

GO TO MASKS PAGE

GO TO ANIMALS IN AFRICAN ART PAGE

HOMEPAGE

 Index by
TRIBE

 Index by
OBJECT

CONTACT US