AFRICAN DRUMS


 This page is a record of an exhibit that took place
in 2001. The individual links below will take you to
the CURRENT VERSION of the pages
that formed part of that exhibit.
+

AFRICAN DRUMS:

African drums were musical instruments, ceremonial objects and means of communication. The large exhibit focuses on the traditional drums of the Yoruba, Senufo, Kuba, Akan, Chokwe and other peoples, plus slit drums of the Yaka, Dan and Yangere. The drums range from everyday objects with monumental, simple forms to ornate pieces bringing status to the owner, connoting power and the honoring of ancestors.

Other instruments, such as gongs, horns, kora, harps and mbira (thumb pianos) are also included. Most of the exhibit is visual; many pieces are not capable of being played, but some are. We also have contemporary jembe drums, talking drums and balliphones all intended for play.

VARIOUS DRUMS

MANGBETU
Slit drum 103
21" h x 25" w
$1000

MUMUYE
Slit drum 1
22" high
$1000

YANGERE
Drum 5
12x29"
$1000

YORUBA
Drum
Catalog

YORUBA
Drum
Catalog

YORUBA
Drum
Catalog

ATTIE
Drum 1
$800

BAMILEKE
Drum
Catalog

YAKA
Drum
Catalog

SENUFO
Drum
Catalog

KUBA
Drum
Catalog

IGBO
Drum
Catalog

DAN
Drum
Catalog

CHOKWE
Drum
Catalog



 Djembe
Drum
Catalog

Talking
Drum
Catalog

BOURE
Drum 2
9.5", $300

MENDE
Drum 1
24", $300

 

IGBO
Drum Catalog

 BAMILEKE
Drum Catalog

 

Slit Drum 1
13x52", SOLD

 

MADINGA Drum 1
13x39", 38 lbs., $800

 

MBEMBE Drum 1
19x53", 105 lbs., $1500

 

MBEMBE Drum 1
19x53", 105 lbs., $1500

  MAKONDE
Drum 1
16", $350

SONGYE
Drum 2
$1000

CUICA
Drum 1
$150

BOWL, Drum 1
5.5" x 9.5"
$100

African
Mbira
Catalog

African
Harps
Catalog

YORUBA,
Gong
Catalog

Animal, Drum 1
11" x 25.5"
$600

African
Horn
Catalog

BAMILEKE,
Gong
Catalog

African
Gong
Catalog

African
Rattles
Catalog

MAKONDE,
Drummer
$400

 

DRUM CATALOGS:

YORUBA, CEREMONIAL DRUMS, Nigeria

The most impressive collection in the exhibit are the ten Yoruba ceremonial drums, all deeply carved with figures or heads. From the large poster piece on the left to the smallest, each shows a careful design and execution meant to foster both belief and prestige.


BAMILEKE, DRUMS, Cameroon

Six Bamileke drums, embellished with low relief carving of figures, animals and objects show the creativity and power the Bamileke put into functional objects. We have one massive Slit drum used primarily as a signal gong to alert, assemble or inform the population. Variations in the thickness of the walls would vary the tones when struck by heavy wooden drum sticks. One unusually complex form seems to be a hybrid of styles.


YAKA, DRUMS, Dem. Rep. of Congo

Slit drums, with hollow chambers and long narrow openings that resonate when struck, often take a human or animal form in which the drum becomes the body. Several vertical examples from the Yaka people show careful execution,


SENUFO, DRUMS, Ivory Coast

Five tall Senufo drums, embellished with low relief animals, exhibit a subtle surface elegance and well designed form


DAN, DRUMS, Liberia

Slit drums, with hollow chambers and long narrow openings that resonate when struck, often take a human or animal form in which the drum becomes the body. Several vertical examples from the Dan people show careful execution,


KUBA, DRUMS, Dem. Rep. of Congo

Nine Kuba examples, with their intricate intertwined abstract designs, a few with faces or hand motifs, show the variety and skill known for Kuba sculpture.


IGBO, CEREMONIAL DRUMS, Nigeria

Slit drums, with hollow chambers and long narrow openings that resonate when struck, often take a human or animal form in which the drum becomes the body. The Igbo use both the vertical and the larger horizontal type. We have one massive slit drum used primarily as a signal gong to alert, assemble or inform the population. Variations in the thickness of the walls would vary the tones when struck by heavy wooden drum sticks.We are also showing a tall, skinheaded drum with wonderful relief carving.


CHOKWE, DRUMS, Angola

Two Chokwe drums, with their intricate abstract designs and faces, are double-headed.


DJEMBE DRUMS, West Africa

The most common and popular drums in west Africa, djembes are distinguished by their simple but elegant shapes and powerful sound. New examples can be tightened and tuned by tying the lines together.


TALKING DRUMS, West Africa

Talking drums are smaller and quieter then the Djembes, and get their name from the tonal range (voices) with which it can speak by squeezing and releasing the vertical strings to tighten and loosen the heads. Most are double headed and are struck by a special curved stick.

 


OTHER INSTRUMENTS, AFRICA

African
Gong
Catalog

YORUBA,
Gong
Catalog

African
Mbira
Catalog

African
Harps
Catalog

African
Horn
Catalog

BAMILEKE,
Gong
Catalog

African
Rattles
Catalog

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