EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) HEADDRESSES ARCHIVES (ALL SOLD)

The headdresses below have all been sold and are left here for reference and educational purposes.

For UNSOLD Ejagham ( Ekoi ) headdresses:

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) JANUS HEADDRESSES PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) ANIMAL HEADDRESSES PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) HEADS PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) JANUS HEADS PAGE

 

EJAGHAM 31
SOLD

 

EJAGHAM 31
SOLD

 

 EJAGHAM 32
SOLD

EJAGHAM 32
, SOLD

 

 EJAGHAM 33
SOLD

EJAGHAM 33
SOLD

 EJAGHAM 35
SOLD
 

 EJAGHAM 35
1SOLD

EJAGHAM 3
SOLD

EJAGHAM 8
SOLD

 

EJAGHAM 9
SOLD
 

EJAGHAM 12
SOLD

 

EJAGHAM 13
SOLD
 

 

EJAGHAM 15
SOLD

 

EJAGHAM 27
SOLD

 

EJAGHAM 42
SOLD



 EJAGHAM 45
SOLD
 

Photographs © Tim Hamill

EJAGHAM, HEADDRESSES, Nigeria

In the southeastern forest region of Nigeria, the Ejagham (Ekoi) people live in a politically decentralized group of small, scattered villages with with several clans united under the leadership of a priest/chief (Ntoon). A Ntoon is responsible for the ritual activities of the community while the political functions are performed by various societies of elders and age-grade associations of young men.

The important art forms of the Ejagham people are connected with the institution of the Ntoon and with the men's and women 's associations. The best known of these art forms are the large, skin-covered headdresses (crest masks) and the most distinctive of these elaborate sculptures are the realistic female headdress topped with curled "horns" representing elegant hairstyles. Crest masks are attached to basketry caps worn on the top of the head and were made by an artist who carved the form from a single piece of wood and covered it with soft, untanned antelope skin that had been soaked in water for several days. He stretched and tacked the skin into place until it dried and stiffened. Eyes, scarifications, and hair were often carved separately and pegged into the finished piece. Before being worn, the headdress was painted or colored, then adorned with metal pieces, wooden pegs, real hair, porcupine quills, feathers, or feathered rods stuck into holes at the top.

The headdress would have been secured on the wearer's head by a string under the chin, with the body covered entirely by a long gown. These might have been worn by a woman in the context of an Ejagham women's society called Ekpa, which was responsible for the education of the girls in preparation for marriage. The headdress could represent a girl that evokes ideal female beauty and is ready for marriage. The depicted hairstyle was worn during the coming-out ceremony following the girls' seclusion.

Much of this material has been taken from a wonderful book: A History of Art in Africa published by Harry N. Abrams. The relevant chapter is Cross River by Robin Poyner.

GO TO SKIN EXHIBITION PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) HEADS PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) JANUS HEADS PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) JANUS HEADDRESSES PAGE

GO TO EJAGHAM ( EKOI ) ANIMAL HEADDRESSES PAGE

GO TO MASKS AND HEADS PAGE

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